BuySellAds.com

Until Dec 3rd, 44% off all Manning books, including Barcodes with iOS! Promo code: mobicftw
Our DNA is written in Objective-C
Jump

Category Archive for ‘Business’ rss

Our Revenues

I received a spreadsheet from our accountant that totals our company revenues over the various categories of income that we receive. I figured, why not share this with you? I won’t tell you the absolute numbers, but I think the relative distribution might be interesting.

19 months ago I wrote about the various kinds of income an iOS development outfit can have, when I was basically still in the discovery phase. Taking a long hard look at the distribution over those categories should yield some insights as to how to tweak the amount of effort you put into the various items.

Read more

Please Respect Your iOS Artists

I am so angry right now. It is taking a lot of restraint to not be resorting to swear words about this one well-known corporation. Trust me, every time I have to cancel an invoice for a component from my Parts Store I am contemplating creating a black list page on my site. Those would be the companies to not do business with.

But I never carry this through. I don’t like to burn bridges. At least not fully.

Read more

Black Friday Sale

Don’t miss our Black Friday sale. 

SAVE 50% ON EVERY APP!

GeoCorder

$2.99 $0.99

Linguan (Mac)

$19.99 $9.99

iWoman

$3.99 $1.99

Summertime

$1.99 $0.99

SpeakerClock

$0.99 Free

iFR Cockpit

Free

 

ONE DAY ONLY!

 

Q&A: Licensing my Stuff

Luis asks:

“I’m a lawyer who represents a variety of software companies, and a former developer. One of my clients would like to use your nsnotifications/background thread code in their product. Can they use it under the terms of an open source license, such as the MIT license? If not, is it available as part of the Cocoanetics parts store, or some other license?”

Thanks for asking, Luis! I’m happy to answer this as I am considering your diligent asking as a compliment.

Read more

Once Upon a Contract

Notice: The following text is a rant and entirely my own opinion, not being a lawyer by profession, but a developer at heart.

Over the past month or so I was negotiating with a US-based company who wanted to retain my services as an expert on Rich Text and HTML parsing. Let me share a problem I had with a certain section in the contract that I was asked to sign, a problem that related to my previously created code and for-pay components.

Even experienced developers might be overly anxious to sign their next big contract to put food on the table without knowing what rights in their works they are signing over by this. This should serve as a gentle reminder: Better to read through the contract, all 19 pages of it, than having to be afraid that you inadvertently giving away your crown jewels.

If I learned one thing from Steve Jobs then it is to not trust contracts that are longer than a single page …

Read more

App Review Advice for YouTube v2

I googled “Clint Eastwood Invisible Obama” because I was wondering why suddenly everybody is posting pictures of chairs with invisible presidents in them, hash tag #eastwooding. Of course there already was a video of the 10-minute speech to be found on YouTube, so I watched that.

The video quality bad, really bad, 360p kind of bad. I was watching it on my iPad 3 where I still sport iOS 5. This is my comfortable consumption device and where would consumption be without a YouTube client. You know, iOS 6 doesn’t have one any more. I am not referring to Mr. Eastwoods remarks when I am calling the experience painful.

YouTube is going to great lengths to prevent people from getting at the h.264 videos they are specifically preparing for iOS devices. Only the YouTube app as well as the MPMoviePlayerController’s that webviews overlay to fake embedded video know how to request the actual video data from Google’s servers. This video stream is then served as a progressive download.

The video was stalling every 3-5 minutes and frantically hacking at the play button would not have made any difference. Only if I moved the slider into the future, waited until the new position was showing and then moving it back to where it had stopped was I able to continue viewing.

Read more

Pixate Reboots Their Kickstarter (Scandal)

Paul Colton contacted me on July 17th, a week before they went live with their first Kickstarter campaign. Always happy to support my fellow iOS developers I agreed that I would make Linguan available for a reward if they could make it work. Unfortunately Kickstarter’s rules prohibit offering of products that the project owners didn’t make themselves. So that tie-in never materialized.

Colton launched Pixate as a product that promises to allow you to use a CSS subset to style UIKit controls instead of doing that in code or Interface Builder. People who hear this tend to fall into two categories: “WTF? Keep that non-native HTML crap away from me!” and “Awesome, now I can design my UI in Safari”.

Their promise certainly is a polarizing one. I find it even more fascinating and unsettling what seems to be going on behind the scenes. The latest developments triggered my sense of fairness quite a bit and this prompted me to summarize what I feel deserves to be called a scandal.

Read more

iCatalog+

Our partners at International Color Services (ICS) have been rather busy throughout the summer. The main reason is that we released the next major update to the iCatalog.framework, adding several new features which are nowadays a “must have” for a state-of-the-art digital catalog experience. We call it simply iCatalog+ because it offers way more than just catalogs.

Several catalog clients already have their free iCatalog+ on the App Store, you should definitely check these out.

Read more

GIC Acquires Cocoapedia

Grupo Imaginación Cibernética (GIC), a software development company based in Mexico, agrees to acquire Cocoapedia’s brand and assets after winning the bidding on Monday, July 16th. Cocoanetics sought to sell Cocoapedia because it no longer fit the company’s focus.

Read more

Licensing Fonts for Use in Apps

When Marco Armant talked about licensing custom fonts for use in apps I did a bit of research myself because I wanted to know the modalities available for us iOS developers.

There are many businesses based on licensing fonts for use on desktop machines as well as web apps. But just to get a general feeling about this I semi-randomly picked MyFonts.com. They also have a fabulous app called What The Font? on the app store that lets you find fonts by snapping a picture of some text.

The font business has not really cared much about apps so far, but now with a Retina display in the size of an iPad this becomes a viable target market for them, as developers are trying to get an unique look by offering great fonts for apps that you read something with.

Read more